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20130201
20130209
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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
intelligence committee chaired by an feinstein brought the hearing to a halt. >> year-old mother and 92-year- old father who emigrated from ireland nearly 65 years ago. >> [inaudible] >> we're going to halt the hearing. and when asked the room be cleared and the codepink associates not be permitted to come back in. we've done this five times now, and five times are enough. >> 8 codepink activists were arrested. we'll have more on the hearing and be joined by the codepink founder medea gen -- mehdi benjamin. we will also speak with investigative journalist jeremy scahill and former cia analyst mel goodman. tens of thousands have taken to the streets in tunisia for the barrel -- burial procession of an opposition leader assassinated earlier this week. a political crisis has been mounting since the murder of chokri belaid, a leading human rights advocate and outspoken critic of the islamist-led government. and it's the turmoil on wednesday, the prime minister proposed to dissolve parliament and form a government but the ruling islamist party has rejected the prime minister's bid. in iraq, a ser
senator feinstein and obama. i say perverse, because he then goes out and commits a set of atrocities with a gun. he sounds completely unhinged, yet the catalyst for all this appeared to be his firing from the lapd. do you have any recollection of what happened with him? do you remember him? >> first off, we don't know hot the catalyst was. the firing was back in 2008, i believe. it's now over five years ago. so what has transpired during those five years, the court several years later upheld the firing. so as to what triggered the actions, the producing of the manifesto, the separate sending of a package to cnn last friday, we don't know. and we won't know until they either apprehend him or other information comes forward. so was it the firing? was it something else that transpired? he appears to have a lot of anger directed to a lot of different people. some who have no relationship at all, as best we can tell, with anything having to do with the discharge. >> the package he sent to anderson cooper, which anderson didn't see until today, wasn't made aware of it, it contained a numbe
. there was no oversight of it. so, i don't know. i do know, though, that senator feinstein has finally gotten, she's the chairman of the senate intelligence committee, has finally gotten a report out of the committee, through the republicans and senate vote, allegedly it's 6,000 pages long. and it covers all things torture. and she's very upset about the film. and she believes that whatever you want to say about torture and its human rights violations, that it did not produce the intelligence that the film suggests that it did. >> and she says the use of these harsh interrogation techniques was quote "far more systematic and widespread than we thought." but how do we ever know if that report isn't published? >> this is one of the problems with oversight of national security matters. some of these things have to remain secret. you can debate over which ones should and which ones shouldn't. but someone has to decide that this information can be released without harming national security. and i don't see that happening any time in the near future. it is possible that some of the findings could get ou
feinstein. >> if you could please expedite the removal. >> more important than the children of pakistan and yemen? are they more important? do your job! >> the hearing serve as a public discussion of the most controversial counterterrorism policies that began under president george w. bush and, in part, have continued and expanded under president obama. brennan's defense of the secrecy surrounding the administration's most questionable program, targeted assassinations using drone aircraft, was as opaque as the program itself. >> what we need to do is optimize transparency on these issues, but at the same time optimize secrecy and the protection of our national security. i don't think that it's one or the other. it's trying to optimize both of them. >> some senators, including ron widen and angus king, pushed brennan to explain the legal at and justification for assassinating american citizens abroad. >> every american has the right to know when their government believes it's allowed to kill them. >> i understand you can't have co-commanders in chief, but having the executive being the p
. the senators from san francisco and california, the 49ers, senators feinstein and boxer. speaker pelosi was with us yesterday in new orleans. and thousands of fans from all over the world and, of course, watching on television. and i think -- i wanted to make a note on this floor, not because it was just a sporting event -- although it's one of i think the highest watched super bowls ever in the history of the game, but, mr. president, because of the role that this congress played and the administration in helping this great city and region and state rebound from what was a devastating body blow 7 1/2 years ago when hurricane katrina and then rita hit three weeks later and then the levees broke anin over 52 places, the city wt virtually underwater, at least two-thirds of the city. and to see 7 1/2 years later the city rebound, the people of new orleans and louisiana are just foremost in my thoughts right now for their fighting spirit, theirry sell yancy, their unwilling -- their resiliency, their unwillingness to give occupy this special place in will celebrate its 300th birthday in 201
in knowing what is happening. senator dianne feinstein, democrat from california, had an exchange. let's listen. [video clip] >> i would like to ask you about the status of the administration's effort to institutionalize rules and procedures for the conduct of drones strikes. in particular, how you see your role as cia director in the approval process. >> as of this committee knows, and i am sure once to continue to protect certain covert action activities. but let me talk generally about the counter-terrorism program and the role of the cia and its effort to try to institutionalize and ensure we have as rigorous a process as possible. that we feel we are taking the appropriate action at the appropriate time. the president insisted any action we take will be legally grounded, will be thoroughly anchored in intelligence. will have the appropriate review process, approval process before any action is contemplated, including those actions that might involve the use of lethal force. the different parts of the government involved in the process are part of the interagency and as terrorism -
and was sort of smacked down by dianne feinstein. but now it's out there so much that the secrecy element is gone, and i think there has to be a real discussion both about the constitutionality particularly when it comes to american citizens but also the wider ramifications of whether this is actually serving our national security cause. because whilst you're taking out some al qaeda leaders, you're causing huge amounts of resentments in some of these areas and possibly fueling the next generation of militants in places like yemen and the pakistani borders, if we extend it into somalia or mali, there are a whole lot of people who are going to feel extremely angry about missiles raining down out of the sky and taking down people not always associated with terrorism. there's a story in "the new york times" this morning of an imam who spoke out against al qaeda. operatives came to speak to him. as they were speaking under a tree to threaten him, missiles came down and took them out. what does that do in that community in terms of a sense of what america is doing, anger towards america and th
guns. have you looked at the feinstein bill? that is exactly what he has done. i think of what they will do is turn this universal check on the law-abiding into a universal registry of law-abiding people, law abiding people do not want that. >> forgive me, sir, you take something that is here and say that it will go all the way over there. there is no indication. i can understand that you are saying that that is the threat, but nothing from the -- but nothing from the administration indicates that. >> obama care was not a tax until they needed to be a tax. >> that was the supreme court. host: weighing in on the conversation, the financial crisis, did it delay your retirement? on twitter you can participate as well. host: let's hear from sandra in virginia. hello. caller: i am the wife of a retired pastor. he is not retired, we cannot retire. because when the crash happened, we received notice from our retirement fund that in order for them to serve everyone, they were going to cut everyone, so we got a cut from 2100 per month to 1600 per month. my husband has to continue workin
. they felt like they have been stonewalling. one scene i thought was memorable, when dianne feinstein took after him for not allowing senate staff access to a lot of this information really was a window on how washington works that, you know, people think that senators sort of pore over a lot of these and study them. their staffs brief them and tell them what's going on. the suggestion staff can't have access is debilitating as we saw yesterday. >> it was interesting that brennan said that he, when waterboarding came on, when he was at the cia that he was not in a position to try to stop it, but that he had expressed his reservations about it, his opposition to it and that he would never happen under his watch under director of cia. did that come across as auth authentic? a little bit different from waterboarding. something president obama ostensibly put a stop to said we don't water board. we don't torture. so the belief is i guess, it goes on some of these cia black sites that may or may not exist officially. >> so on the drones, i mean when the flap started
the room. >> stephanie: that was senator feinstein. >> yeah. >> stephanie: huh? >> hum. >> stephanie: okay. >> it's just interesting, you know. >> stephanie: i had this debate, i was on governor granholm's last show -- [ applause ] >> stephanie: i can't breathe without her. she might be up for a cabinet post, though. i'll just keep calling her over and oversee if she'll take my call. >> no, she won't. >> stephanie: no but we had a really interesting discussion this is just not a black or whitish you. but she believed that the president is fighting a smarter tougher war on terror and george bush with one bomb took out several blocks in iraq bought he thought saadam might be there or whatever. and talk about a dumb war. mickey in south dakota you are on the "stephanie miller show." hi mickey. >> caller: yes. howdy everybody. first off i wish i could come see you guys in chicago. i can't financially afford it but -- >> stephanie: we have some $25 tickets on sale -- >> it's getting there from south dakota -- >> stephanie: yeah. >> caller: but at least i get you on direc
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)